Immigration is central to the growth and identity of the Hispanic population. Almost all of the project's research, regardless of topic, includes separate tabulations of data for U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanics. Research on immigration focuses on the unauthorized population, overall trends in immigration and public attitudes towards immigrants and immigration policy.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

ReportsMarch 21, 2002

How Many Undocumented

The Numbers Behind The U.S.-Mexico Migration Talks

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

Estimates of Numbers of Unauthorized Migrants Residing In the United States

The Total, Mexican, and Non-Mexican Central American Unauthorized Populations in Mid-2001

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

The Socioeconomic Status of Hispanic New Yorkers

Current Trends and Future Prospects

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

The Impact of the 2001/2002 Economic Recession on Hispanic Workers

Currently there are nearly 35 million Hispanics in the U.S., making them the second-largest ethnic group in the country. But the effect of the current recession on this important group is unknown. Yet, it is unlikely that all Hispanics have been similarly affected by the recession. Hispanics are a varied group not just in terms of national origin, but also in terms of time in the U.S., ranging from newly arrived immigrants to U.S.-born Hispanics. This report examines how three generations of Hispanics have fared in September and October 2001, compared to September 2000 and September 1999.