Immigration is central to the growth and identity of the Hispanic population. Almost all of the project's research, regardless of topic, includes separate tabulations of data for U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanics. Research on immigration focuses on the unauthorized population, overall trends in immigration and public attitudes towards immigrants and immigration policy.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

Fact SheetsApril 26, 2006

Estimates of the Unauthorized Migrant Population for States based on the March 2005 CPS

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsApril 13, 2006

The Labor Force Status of Short-Term Unauthorized Workers

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsApril 5, 2006

Recently Arrived Migrants and the Congressional Debate on Immigration

Fact Sheet

ReportsMarch 30, 2006

America’s Immigration Quandary

A growing number of Americans believe that immigrants are a burden to the country, taking jobs and housing and creating strains on the health care system. Many people also worry about the cultural impact of the expanding number of newcomers in the U.S.

ReportsMarch 7, 2006

Size and Characteristics of the Unauthorized Migrant Population in the U.S.

Estimates Based on the March 2005 Current Population Survey

DatasetsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

The study was conducted for Pew Hispanic Center via telephone by International Communications Research, an independent research company.

ReportsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.

ReportsDecember 15, 2005

The Occupational Status and Mobility of Hispanics

Hispanics and whites perform different types of work in the labor market. Moreover, the occupational divide between the two largest segments of the labor force appears to be widening.

ReportsDecember 6, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Three

The vast majority of undocumented migrants from Mexico were gainfully employed before they left for the United States. Thus, failure to find work at home does not seem to be the primary reason that the estimated 6.3 million undocumented migrants from Mexico have come to the U.S.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The Higher Drop-Out Rate of Foreign-Born Teens

A report on high school enrollment points to the importance of schooling abroad in understanding the dropout problem for immigrant teens, finding that those teens have often fallen behind in their education before reaching the United States.