May. 9, 2013

Hispanic High School Graduates Pass Whites in Rate of College Enrollment

High School Drop-out Rate at Record Low

Aug. 14, 2012

Up to 1.7 Million Unauthorized Immigrant Youth May Benefit from New Deportation Rules

Up to 1.7 million unauthorized immigrants ages 30 and under who arrived in the U.S. as children are eligible for a new Obama administration program that would shield them from deportation and enable them to apply for temporary but renewable work permits, according to updated estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center.

Sep. 28, 2011

Childhood Poverty Among Hispanics Sets Record, Leads Nation

The Toll of the Great Recession

Aug. 25, 2011

Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

24% Growth from 2009 to 2010

Aug. 11, 2010

Unauthorized Immigrants and Their U.S.-Born Children

An estimated 340,000 of the 4.3 million babies born in the United States in 2008 were the offspring of unauthorized immigrants, according to a new analysis of Census Bureau data.

Jul. 28, 2010

The Latino Digital Divide: The Native Born versus The Foreign Born

Native-born Latinos are more likely than their foreign-born counterparts to go online and to use cell phones, according to a new report from the Pew Hispanic Center.

Jul. 28, 2010

How Young Latinos Communicate with Friends in the Digital Age

When it comes to socializing and communicating with friends, young Latinos (ages 16 to 25) make extensive use of mobile technology. Half say they text message (50%) their friends daily, and 45% say they talk daily with friends on a cell phone.

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Dec. 11, 2009

Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

Dec. 11, 2009

Graphic: Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

Dec. 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.