ReportsOctober 5, 2006

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education: New Students, New Schools

Since the mid-1990s, two trends have transformed the landscape of American public education: Enrollment has increased because of the growth of the Hispanic population, and the number of schools has also increased.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The High Schools Hispanics Attend

A report on the characteristics of high schools attended by different racial and ethnic groups finds that Hispanic teens are more likely than blacks and whites to attend the nation’s largest public high schools.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The Higher Drop-Out Rate of Foreign-Born Teens

A report on high school enrollment points to the importance of schooling abroad in understanding the dropout problem for immigrant teens, finding that those teens have often fallen behind in their education before reaching the United States.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

Recent Changes in the Entry of Hispanic and White Youth into College

In addition to longstanding concerns over high school completion, policymakers are increasingly focused on disparities in outcomes between Hispanic and white college students.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2005

Hispanics: A People in Motion

The places Latinos live, the jobs they hold, the schooling they complete, the languages they speak, even their attitudes on key political and social issues, are all in flux.

ReportsJune 23, 2004

Latino Youth Finishing College

The Role Of Selective Pathways

ReportsJune 23, 2004

Latino Youth and the Pathway to College

This study was conducted by the Educational Policy Institute through a grant from the Pew Hispanic Center to provide the most up-to-date analysis of Latino achievement through postsecondary education. The study analyses the latest installment of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS), begun in 1988 with eighth grade students and followed up several times, with the last follow-up survey in 2000: eight years after scheduled high school graduation.

ReportsJune 23, 2004

Federal Policy and Latinos in Higher Education

The purpose of this study is to describe federal legislation and programs that support higher education and to assess Latino participation in these programs. While there are many programs at the state, institutional, and community levels that facilitate access to higher education for Latinos, the Higher Education Act (HEA), due for reauthorization this year, is the main policy vehicle at the federal level for postsecondary education programs. These programs provide concrete examples of educational activities that can inform–and be informed by–local activities and programs to facilitate Latino student access, persistence, and completion of higher education. A series of developments in the costs and financing of colleges and universities set the context for HEA reauthorization.

Fact SheetsJanuary 26, 2004

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation National Survey of Latinos

Summary and Chartpack

DatasetsJanuary 26, 2004

2004 National Survey of Latinos: Education

This is a comprehensive survey of Latino attitudes toward education, public schools and a variety of education issues, including the No Child Left Behind Act.