ReportsJune 14, 2005

Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics

Most of the unauthorized population lives in families, a quarter has at least some college education and illegal workers can be found in many sectors of the US economy.

ReportsMarch 21, 2005

Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Undocumented Population

The undocumented population of the US now numbers nearly 11 million people, including more than 6 million Mexicans according to new estimates based on the most recent official data available.

ReportsMarch 2, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part One

Most Mexican migrants want to remain in this country indefinitely but would participate in a temporary worker program that granted them legal status for a time and eventually required them to return to Mexico.

ReportsDecember 27, 2004

Dispersal and Concentration: Patterns of Latino Residential Settlement

Some 20 million Hispanics—57 percent of the total—lived in neighborhoods in which Hispanics made up less than half of the population at the time of the 2000 census.

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Latinos in California, Texas, New York, Florida and New Jersey

Fact Sheet

ReportsOctober 14, 2003

The Rise Of The Second Generation

As it continues to grow, the composition of the Hispanic population is undergoing a fundamental change: Births in the United States are outpacing immigration as the key source of growth. Over the next twenty years this will produce an important shift in the makeup of the Hispanic population with second-generation Latinos–the U.S.-born children of immigrants– emerging as the largest component of that population. Given the very substantial differences in earnings, education, fluency in English, and attitudes between foreign-born and native-born Latinos, this shift has profound implications for many realms of public policy, and indeed for anyone seeking to understand the nature of demographic change in the United States.

ReportsDecember 4, 2002

The Improving Educational Profile Of Latino Immigrants

It is a commonplace claim that the education level of the Latino immigrant population is continually falling behind that of the U.S.-born population. However, the Pew Hispanic Center finds that the educational profile of the adult population of foreign-born Latinos has improved significantly during the past three decades. These gains, however, have not yet produced a notable convergence with the level of education in the native-born U.S. population. During the period 1970 to 2000 the native-born population also experienced improvements of education that outpaced the progress among Latino immigrants. Nonetheless, the trends identified in this report suggest that the gap between immigrants and natives will narrow in the future.

Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2002

The Latino Population and the Latino Electorate

The Numbers Differ

ReportsJuly 30, 2002

Latino Growth In Metropolitan America

Changing Patterns, New Locations

ReportsMarch 21, 2002

How Many Undocumented

The Numbers Behind The U.S.-Mexico Migration Talks