The National Survey of Latinos is a nationally representative survey of Hispanic adults conducted annually since 2002 by the Pew Research Center. The NSL explores the attitudes and opinions of the nation’s fast growing Latino population on topics ranging from identity to politics to immigration policy to education to religion and health care, among others.

To download the dataset for NSL surveys, visit our Data and Resources page.

ReportsNovember 14, 2012

An Awakened Giant: The Hispanic Electorate is Likely to Double by 2030

Aging, Naturalization and Immigration Will Drive Growth

ReportNovember 2, 2012

Latinos Express Growing Confidence In Personal Finances, Nation’s Direction

ReportsOctober 11, 2012

Latino Voters Support Obama by 3-1 Ratio, But Are Less Certain than Others about Voting

Latino registered voters prefer President Barack Obama over Republican challenger Mitt Romney by 69% to 21% and express growing satisfaction with the direction of the nation and the state of their personal finances but are somewhat less certain than non-Hispanics that they will vote in this election, according to a new nationwide survey of 1,765 Latinos.

ReportsApril 4, 2012

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

A majority of Hispanics say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.

ReportsJanuary 26, 2012

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

A majority of Latinos believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.