The National Survey of Latinos is a nationally representative survey of Hispanic adults conducted annually since 2002 by the Pew Research Center. The NSL explores the attitudes and opinions of the nation’s fast growing Latino population on topics ranging from identity to politics to immigration policy to education to religion and health care, among others.

To download the dataset for NSL surveys, visit our Data and Resources page.

ReportsNovember 15, 2010

National Latino Leader? The Job is Open

When asked in an open-ended question on a nationwide survey of Latinos to name the person they consider “the most important Latino leader in the country today,” nearly two-thirds (64%) of Hispanics said they did not know.

ReportsOctober 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

The national political backlash against illegal immigration has created new divisions among Latinos and heightened their concerns about discrimination against members of their ethnic group-including those who were born in the United States or who immigrated legally.

ReportsOctober 5, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Elections: Strong Support for Democrats; Weak Voter Motivation

In a year when support for Democratic candidates has eroded, the party’s standing among one key voting group—Latinos—appears as strong as ever.

ReportsJuly 28, 2010

The Latino Digital Divide: The Native Born versus The Foreign Born

Native-born Latinos are more likely than their foreign-born counterparts to go online and to use cell phones, according to a new report from the Pew Hispanic Center.

ReportsJuly 28, 2010

How Young Latinos Communicate with Friends in the Digital Age

When it comes to socializing and communicating with friends, young Latinos (ages 16 to 25) make extensive use of mobile technology. Half say they text message (50%) their friends daily, and 45% say they talk daily with friends on a cell phone.