The National Survey of Latinos is a nationally representative survey of Hispanic adults conducted annually since 2002 by the Pew Research Center. The NSL explores the attitudes and opinions of the nation’s fast growing Latino population on topics ranging from identity to politics to immigration policy to education to religion and health care, among others.

To download the dataset for NSL surveys, visit our Data and Resources page.

ReportsJuly 22, 2004

The 2004 National Survey Of Latinos: Politics and Civic Participation

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation

Fact SheetsJuly 22, 2004

The Hispanic Electorate in 2004

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Assimilation and Language

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Bilingualism

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Generational Differences

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Health Care Experiences

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsJanuary 26, 2004

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation National Survey of Latinos

Summary and Chartpack

ReportsJanuary 26, 2004

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation National Survey Of Latinos

National Survey of Latinos: Education is a new comprehensive survey of Latino attitudes toward education, public schools and a variety of education issues, including the No Child Left Behind Act. This national survey is released against the backdrop of major changes in the nation’s K-12 system as states and school districts apply sweeping new federal requirements. Conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Kaiser Family Foundation, the survey includes substantial comparison samples of whites and African Americans.

ReportsJanuary 7, 2004

Immigration Data Excerpts

In light of President George W. Bush's January 7, 2004 announcement of a new immigration initiative, the Pew Hispanic Center provided information about attitudes towards immigrant and immigration policy, and estimates of the size of the undocumented population in the United States. Sources for the data are the National Survey of Latinos, conducted in 2002 jointly by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Center's March 2002 report entitled “How Many Undocumented: The Numbers Behind the U.S.-Mexico Migration Talk.”