ReportsMarch 7, 2006

Size and Characteristics of the Unauthorized Migrant Population in the U.S.

Estimates Based on the March 2005 Current Population Survey

ReportsDecember 6, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Three

The vast majority of undocumented migrants from Mexico were gainfully employed before they left for the United States. Thus, failure to find work at home does not seem to be the primary reason that the estimated 6.3 million undocumented migrants from Mexico have come to the U.S.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The Higher Drop-Out Rate of Foreign-Born Teens

A report on high school enrollment points to the importance of schooling abroad in understanding the dropout problem for immigrant teens, finding that those teens have often fallen behind in their education before reaching the United States.

ReportsSeptember 27, 2005

Rise, Peak and Decline: Trends in U.S. Immigration 1992 – 2004

The number of migrants coming to the United States each year, legally and illegally, grew very rapidly starting in the mid-1990s, hit a peak at the end of the decade, and then declined substantially after 2001.

ReportsJuly 26, 2005

The New Latino South: The Context and Consequences of Rapid Population Growth

The Hispanic population is growing faster in much of the South than anywhere else in the United States.

ReportsJune 14, 2005

Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics

Most of the unauthorized population lives in families, a quarter has at least some college education and illegal workers can be found in many sectors of the US economy.

ReportsMarch 21, 2005

Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Undocumented Population

The undocumented population of the US now numbers nearly 11 million people, including more than 6 million Mexicans according to new estimates based on the most recent official data available.

Fact SheetsMarch 19, 2004

Generational Differences

Fact Sheet

ReportsOctober 14, 2003

The Rise Of The Second Generation

As it continues to grow, the composition of the Hispanic population is undergoing a fundamental change: Births in the United States are outpacing immigration as the key source of growth. Over the next twenty years this will produce an important shift in the makeup of the Hispanic population with second-generation Latinos–the U.S.-born children of immigrants– emerging as the largest component of that population. Given the very substantial differences in earnings, education, fluency in English, and attitudes between foreign-born and native-born Latinos, this shift has profound implications for many realms of public policy, and indeed for anyone seeking to understand the nature of demographic change in the United States.

DatasetsDecember 17, 2002

2002 National Survey of Latinos

This survey was designed to explore the attitudes and experiences of Latinos on a wide variety of topics.