ReportsApril 23, 2012

Net Migration from Mexico Falls to Zero—and Perhaps Less

The largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States has come to a standstill.

ReportsMarch 21, 2012

The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery

Employment Gains by Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Nativity

Statistical PortraitsFebruary 21, 2012

2010, Foreign-Born Population in the United States Statistical Portrait

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2010 American Community Survey.

ReportsJanuary 9, 2012

U.S. Foreign-Born Population: How Much Change from 2009 to 2010?

The U.S. population in 2010 included 39.9 million foreign-born residents. This estimate, the latest available for the foreign-born population, is 1.5 million, or 4%, higher than the survey’s 38.5 million estimate in 2009.

ReportsDecember 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrants: Length of Residency, Patterns of Parenthood

Nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants in the United States have lived in this country for at least 10 years and nearly half are parents of minor children.

ReportsJuly 14, 2011

The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration

Births have surpassed immigration as the main driver of the dynamic growth in the nation’s Mexican-American population. From 2000 to 2010, the Mexican-American population grew by 7.2 million as a result of births and 4.2 million as a result of new immigrant arrivals.

ReportsMarch 24, 2011

Hispanics Account for More than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade

Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos

ReportsFebruary 17, 2011

2009, Foreign-Born Population in the United States Statistical Portrait

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2009 American Community Survey.

ReportsFebruary 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010

As of March 2010, 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants were living in the United States, virtually unchanged from a year earlier, according to new estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center.

ReportsOctober 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

In the year following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers gained 656,000 jobs while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. As a result, the unemployment rate fell for immigrants while it rose for the native born.