DatasetsJuly 13, 2006

The 2006 National Survey of Latinos: The Immigration Debate

This survey was the first major public opinion poll of the Hispanic population to be conducted after the spring 2006 pro-immigration marches and congressional debate.

ReportsJuly 13, 2006

2006 National Survey of Latinos

Latinos are feeling more discriminated against, politically energized and unified following the immigration policy debate and the pro-immigration marches this spring.

Fact SheetsMay 17, 2006

The State of American Public Opinion on Immigration in Spring 2006: A Review of Major Surveys

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsApril 5, 2006

Recently Arrived Migrants and the Congressional Debate on Immigration

Fact Sheet

ReportsMarch 30, 2006

America’s Immigration Quandary

A growing number of Americans believe that immigrants are a burden to the country, taking jobs and housing and creating strains on the health care system. Many people also worry about the cultural impact of the expanding number of newcomers in the U.S.

ReportsAugust 16, 2005

Attitudes toward Immigrants and Immigration Policy: Surveys among Latinos in the U.S. and in Mexico

A survey of U.S. Latinos shows that views are not unanimous on unauthorized migrants and U.S. policy toward them.

ReportsJanuary 7, 2004

Immigration Data Excerpts

In light of President George W. Bush's January 7, 2004 announcement of a new immigration initiative, the Pew Hispanic Center provided information about attitudes towards immigrant and immigration policy, and estimates of the size of the undocumented population in the United States. Sources for the data are the National Survey of Latinos, conducted in 2002 jointly by the Pew Hispanic Center and the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Center's March 2002 report entitled “How Many Undocumented: The Numbers Behind the U.S.-Mexico Migration Talk.”

ReportsOctober 3, 2002

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation National Survey Of Latinos

The Hispanic electorate is emerging as a distinct presence on the political landscape, demonstrating broad but shallow party loyalty and a mixture of ideological beliefs and policy positions that defies easy categorization. At a time when the rest of the nation is almost evenly split along partisan lines, Latino voters appear to straddle some of the sharpest divides in American politics today. Though most Latinos identify with the Democratic Party, this party affiliation comes with a notable ambivalence, and on some social issues they express a conservatism that sets them apart from their white counterparts. Similarly, most Latino Republicans voice a preference for a bigger government and higher taxes, which is contrary to the stand taken by an overwhelming majority of white Republicans.

ReportsMarch 21, 2002

Guest Workers

New Solution, New Problem?