PublicationsOctober 17, 2006

2005, Foreign-Born Population in the United States Statistical Population

This statistical profile of the foreign born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2005 American Community Survey public use microdata file, which was released August 29, 2006.

PublicationsSeptember 16, 2006

2005, Hispanics in the United States Statistical Portrait

This statistical profile of the Latino population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2005 American Community Survey public use microdata file, which was released August 29, 2006.

Fact SheetsJune 7, 2006

Hispanic Attitudes Toward Learning English

Fact Sheet

DatasetsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

The study was conducted for Pew Hispanic Center via telephone by International Communications Research, an independent research company.

ReportsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.

ReportsMarch 14, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Two

Attitudes about Voting in Mexican Elections and Ties to Mexico

ReportsJanuary 24, 2005

Hispanics: A People in Motion

The places Latinos live, the jobs they hold, the schooling they complete, the languages they speak, even their attitudes on key political and social issues, are all in flux.

ReportsDecember 6, 2004

Shades of Belonging

The findings of this study suggest that Hispanics see race as a measure of belonging, and whiteness as a measure of inclusion, or of perceived inclusion.

DatasetsApril 19, 2004

Changing Channels and Crisscrossing Cultures: A Survey of Latinos on the News Media

Getting the news could be the single most extensive cross-cultural experience for the Hispanic population in America.

ReportsApril 19, 2004

Changing Channels and Crisscrossing Cultures

Getting the news could be the single most extensive cross-cultural experience for the Hispanic population in America, according to a report issued today the Pew Hispanic Center. A growing number of Hispanics switch between English and Spanish to get the news. Rather than two audiences sharply segmented by language, the survey shows that many more Latinos get at least some of their news in both English and Spanish than in just one language or the other.