ReportsDecember 4, 2002

The Improving Educational Profile Of Latino Immigrants

It is a commonplace claim that the education level of the Latino immigrant population is continually falling behind that of the U.S.-born population. However, the Pew Hispanic Center finds that the educational profile of the adult population of foreign-born Latinos has improved significantly during the past three decades. These gains, however, have not yet produced a notable convergence with the level of education in the native-born U.S. population. During the period 1970 to 2000 the native-born population also experienced improvements of education that outpaced the progress among Latino immigrants. Nonetheless, the trends identified in this report suggest that the gap between immigrants and natives will narrow in the future.

Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2002

The Latino Population and the Latino Electorate

The Numbers Differ

ReportsSeptember 5, 2002

Latinos In Higher Education

Many Enroll, Too Few Graduate

ReportsJuly 30, 2002

Latino Growth In Metropolitan America

Changing Patterns, New Locations

ReportsMay 9, 2002

Counting The “Other Hispanics”

How Many Colombians, Dominicans, Ecuadorians, Guatemalans And Salvadorans Are There In The United States?

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

New Lows From New Highs

The long-term effects of the recession will likely depress employment and incomes in Hispanic communities at least through the end of 2004, and judging from historical experience that time span will be longer than for any other major population group. Even if predictions of a turnaround later this summer prove valid, pocketbook issues will vex Latinos for several years after the national economy recovers. Second-generation Latinos–U.S.-born children of an immigrant parent– are now experiencing high job losses. In recent recessions Hispanic unemployment has fallen hardest on low-skilled immigrants. This time, young people who are the products of U.S. schools are experiencing the highest unemployment rates among Latinos. Many work in skilled occupations, including managers, technicians and professionals, and many are in the early years of household formation. Prolonged joblessness could prove a historic setback for them, their communities and the nation.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

Hispanics and the Current Economic Downturn

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential impact of the current economic downturn on Hispanic workers and families, and analyze how prepared Hispanics are for the economic recession. The paper is divided into four sections: The first section briefly explores the progress made by Hispanics during the economic boom of the 1990s. The second section uses the experience of Hispanics in past economic downturns to predict how they will fare in the current economic slowdown. The third section analyzes how well prepared Hispanic workers are for the economic slowdown. The final section draws conclusions based on the first three sections.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

The Socioeconomic Status of Hispanic New Yorkers

Current Trends and Future Prospects

Fact SheetsJanuary 1, 2002

Hispanic Health: Divergent and Changing

Fact Sheet

Fact SheetsJanuary 1, 2002

Educational Attainment: Better than Meets the Eye, But Large Challenges Remain

Fact Sheet