Several measures offer insights into Latinos’ economic well-being and the ways in which it has changed over time and how it varies among Latino sub-groups. The project’s research documents trends in income, poverty, homeownership and wealth with an emphasis on the impact of business cycles. Our reports on remittances explore the massive flow of dollars that links Hispanic immigrants with their families back home.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

ReportsDecember 15, 2005

The Occupational Status and Mobility of Hispanics

Hispanics and whites perform different types of work in the labor market. Moreover, the occupational divide between the two largest segments of the labor force appears to be widening.

ReportsDecember 6, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Three

The vast majority of undocumented migrants from Mexico were gainfully employed before they left for the United States. Thus, failure to find work at home does not seem to be the primary reason that the estimated 6.3 million undocumented migrants from Mexico have come to the U.S.

ReportsJuly 26, 2005

The New Latino South: The Context and Consequences of Rapid Population Growth

The Hispanic population is growing faster in much of the South than anywhere else in the United States.

ReportsMay 2, 2005

Latino Labor Report, 2004

Hispanic workers enjoyed significant gains in employment in 2004. But the concentration of Latinos in relatively low-skill occupations contributed to reduced earnings for them for the second year in a row.

ReportsMarch 16, 2005

Hispanics and the Social Security Debate

Latinos have distinct demographic and economic characteristics that give them a unique stake in the debate over the future of Social Security.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2005

Hispanics: A People in Motion

The places Latinos live, the jobs they hold, the schooling they complete, the languages they speak, even their attitudes on key political and social issues, are all in flux.