Several measures offer insights into Latinos’ economic well-being and the ways in which it has changed over time and how it varies among Latino sub-groups. The project’s research documents trends in income, poverty, homeownership and wealth with an emphasis on the impact of business cycles. Our reports on remittances explore the massive flow of dollars that links Hispanic immigrants with their families back home.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

ReportsOctober 18, 2004

The Wealth of Hispanic Households: 1996 to 2002

Hispanic households have less than ten cents for every dollar in wealth owned by White households.

ReportsJune 7, 2004

The Remittance Marketplace: Prices, Policy and Financial Institutions

Although the cost of sending remittances is now much lower than in the late 1990s, the rate of decline has slowed markedly in the past three years.

ReportsJanuary 8, 2004

Latino Attitudes On The War In Iraq, The Economy And The 2004 Election

Latino support for the war in Iraq and for President George W. Bush has surged since the capture of Saddam Hussein, but Latinos remain concerned about the condition of the U.S. economy and the long-term consequences of the war. In order to probe Latino views of the war, the economy, and the upcoming presidential race, the Pew Hispanic Center (PHC) conducted two national surveys of Latino adults. One took place in December 2003, just before Hussein’s capture, and the other in early January 2004