Apr. 4, 2012

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

A majority of Hispanics say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.

Oct. 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

The national political backlash against illegal immigration has created new divisions among Latinos and heightened their concerns about discrimination against members of their ethnic group-including those who were born in the United States or who immigrated legally.

Apr. 29, 2010

Hispanics and Arizona’s New Immigration Law

Fact Sheet

Dec. 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

Apr. 7, 2009

Hispanics and the Criminal Justice System

Low Confidence, High Exposure

Sep. 18, 2008

Hispanics See Their Situation in U.S. Deteriorating; Oppose Key Immigration Enforcement Measures

2008 National Survey of Latinos

Dec. 13, 2007

2007 National Survey of Latinos: As Illegal Immigration Issue Heats Up, Hispanics Feel a Chill

Hispanics in the United States are feeling a range of negative effects from the increased public attention and stepped-up enforcement measures that have accompanied the growing national debate over illegal immigration.

Mar. 30, 2006

America’s Immigration Quandary

No Consensus on Immigration Problem or Proposed Fixes

Apr. 19, 2004

Changing Channels and Crisscrossing Cultures: A Survey of Latinos on the News Media

Getting the news could be the single most extensive cross-cultural experience for the Hispanic population in America.

Apr. 19, 2004

Changing Channels and Crisscrossing Cultures

Getting the news could be the single most extensive cross-cultural experience for the Hispanic population in America, according to a report issued today the Pew Hispanic Center. A growing number of Hispanics switch between English and Spanish to get the news. Rather than two audiences sharply segmented by language, the survey shows that many more Latinos get at least some of their news in both English and Spanish than in just one language or the other.