Rapid growth is the overriding characteristic of the Hispanic population, but that growth comes in many forms. The project’s demographic reports focus on the current and projected growth of the Latino population, trends in immigration, unauthorized migration, countries of origin of U.S. Latinos, regional patterns of settlement and related factors.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

PublicationsNovember 29, 2012

U.S. Birth Rate Falls to a Record Low; Decline Is Greatest Among Immigrants

ReportsNovember 14, 2012

An Awakened Giant: The Hispanic Electorate is Likely to Double by 2030

Aging, Naturalization and Immigration Will Drive Growth

ReportsNovember 7, 2012

Latino Voters in the 2012 Election

Obama 71%; Romney 27%

ReportsOctober 18, 2012

Latinos, Religion and Campaign 2012

Latinos are divided by religion in their preferences in the upcoming presidential election. Three-quarters of Latino Catholics and eight-in-ten religiously unaffiliated Latinos support President Barack Obama’s re-election.

ReportsOctober 11, 2012

Latino Voters Support Obama by 3-1 Ratio, But Are Less Certain than Others about Voting

Latino registered voters prefer President Barack Obama over Republican challenger Mitt Romney by 69% to 21% and express growing satisfaction with the direction of the nation and the state of their personal finances but are somewhat less certain than non-Hispanics that they will vote in this election, according to a new nationwide survey of 1,765 Latinos.

Pew Research CenterOctober 11, 2012

Latinos and the 2012 Election

ReportsOctober 1, 2012

A Record 24 Million Latinos Are Eligible to Vote, But Turnout Rate Has Lagged That of Whites, Blacks

Due to their ongoing population growth, Latinos comprise a greater share of the nation’s eligible voters than they did just a few years ago—11.0% this year, up from 9.5% in 2008 and 8.2% in 2004. However, the turnout rate of eligible Latino voters has historically lagged that of whites and blacks by substantial margins.

Election Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2012

Latinos in the 2012 Election: Alabama

There are 45,000 eligible Hispanic voters in Alabama, 1% of all eligible voters in the state.

Election Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2012

Latinos in the 2012 Election: Arizona

There are 824,000 eligible Hispanic voters in Arizona, 19% of all eligible voters in the state.

Election Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2012

Latinos in the 2012 Election: Arkansas

There are 51,000 eligible Hispanic voters in Arkansas, 2% of all eligible voters in the state.