Rapid growth is the overriding characteristic of the Hispanic population, but that growth comes in many forms. The project’s demographic reports focus on the current and projected growth of the Latino population, trends in immigration, unauthorized migration, countries of origin of U.S. Latinos, regional patterns of settlement and related factors.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

DatasetsDecember 17, 2002

2002 National Survey of Latinos

This survey was designed to explore the attitudes and experiences of Latinos on a wide variety of topics.

ReportsDecember 17, 2002

Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation 2002 National Survey Of Latinos

The Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation 2002 National Survey of Latinos comprehensively explores the attitudes and experiences of Hispanics on a wide variety of topics. This survey was designed to capture the diversity of the Latino population by including almost 3,000 Hispanics from various backgrounds and groups so that in addition to describing Latinos overall, comparisons can be made among key Hispanic subgroups as well.

ReportsDecember 4, 2002

The Improving Educational Profile Of Latino Immigrants

It is a commonplace claim that the education level of the Latino immigrant population is continually falling behind that of the U.S.-born population. However, the Pew Hispanic Center finds that the educational profile of the adult population of foreign-born Latinos has improved significantly during the past three decades. These gains, however, have not yet produced a notable convergence with the level of education in the native-born U.S. population. During the period 1970 to 2000 the native-born population also experienced improvements of education that outpaced the progress among Latino immigrants. Nonetheless, the trends identified in this report suggest that the gap between immigrants and natives will narrow in the future.

Fact SheetsOctober 1, 2002

The Latino Population and the Latino Electorate

The Numbers Differ

ReportsSeptember 5, 2002

Latinos In Higher Education

Many Enroll, Too Few Graduate

ReportsJuly 30, 2002

Latino Growth In Metropolitan America

Changing Patterns, New Locations

ReportsMay 9, 2002

Counting The “Other Hispanics”

How Many Colombians, Dominicans, Ecuadorians, Guatemalans And Salvadorans Are There In The United States?

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

The Impact of the 2001/2002 Economic Recession on Hispanic Workers

Currently there are nearly 35 million Hispanics in the U.S., making them the second-largest ethnic group in the country. But the effect of the current recession on this important group is unknown. Yet, it is unlikely that all Hispanics have been similarly affected by the recession. Hispanics are a varied group not just in terms of national origin, but also in terms of time in the U.S., ranging from newly arrived immigrants to U.S.-born Hispanics. This report examines how three generations of Hispanics have fared in September and October 2001, compared to September 2000 and September 1999.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

The Socioeconomic Status of Hispanic New Yorkers

Current Trends and Future Prospects

ReportsJanuary 24, 2002

New Lows From New Highs

The long-term effects of the recession will likely depress employment and incomes in Hispanic communities at least through the end of 2004, and judging from historical experience that time span will be longer than for any other major population group. Even if predictions of a turnaround later this summer prove valid, pocketbook issues will vex Latinos for several years after the national economy recovers. Second-generation Latinos–U.S.-born children of an immigrant parent– are now experiencing high job losses. In recent recessions Hispanic unemployment has fallen hardest on low-skilled immigrants. This time, young people who are the products of U.S. schools are experiencing the highest unemployment rates among Latinos. Many work in skilled occupations, including managers, technicians and professionals, and many are in the early years of household formation. Prolonged joblessness could prove a historic setback for them, their communities and the nation.