Pew Research CenterDec 19, 2013

On Immigration Policy, Deportation Relief Seen As More Important Than Citizenship

A Survey of Hispanics and Asian Americans

Pew Research CenterJun 27, 2013

How Many Unauthorized Immigrants Would Become U.S. Citizens?

A Portrait of U.S. Immigrants
Pew Research CenterFeb 15, 2013

U.S. Immigrant Population Trends

Key findings from a new analysis of the nation’s foreign-born population, based on U.S. Census Bureau’s 2011 American Community Survey.

Pew Research CenterFeb 4, 2013

The Path Not Taken

Two-thirds of Legal Mexican Immigrants are not U.S. Citizens

Pew Research CenterAug 14, 2012

Up to 1.7 Million Unauthorized Immigrant Youth May Benefit from New Deportation Rules

Up to 1.7 million unauthorized immigrants ages 30 and under who arrived in the U.S. as children are eligible for a new Obama administration program that would shield them from deportation and enable them to apply for temporary but renewable work permits, according to updated estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center.

Pew Research CenterJun 25, 2012

U.S. Public, Hispanics Differ on Arizona Immigration Law

The American public has repeatedly expressed support for Arizona’s immigration law, much of which was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.

Pew Research CenterJun 15, 2012

Up to 1.4 Million Unauthorized Immigrants Could Benefit from New Deportation Policy

Up to 1.4 million children and young adults who are in the United States illegally could potentially benefit from today’s announcement by the Obama Administration about changes in deportation policies.

Pew Research CenterDec 13, 2007

2007 National Survey of Latinos: As Illegal Immigration Issue Heats Up, Hispanics Feel a Chill

Hispanics in the United States are feeling a range of negative effects from the increased public attention and stepped-up enforcement measures that have accompanied the growing national debate over illegal immigration.

Pew Research CenterOct 25, 2007

Between Here and There: How Attached Are Latino Immigrants to Their Native Country?

Most Latino immigrants maintain some kind of connection to their native country by sending remittances, traveling back or telephoning relatives, but the extent to which they engage in these transnational activities varies considerably.

Pew Research CenterMar 28, 2007

Growing Share of Immigrants Choosing Naturalization

The proportion of all legal foreign-born residents who have become naturalized U.S. citizens rose to 52% in 2005, the highest level in a quarter of a century and a 15 percentage point increase since 1990.