Multi-section ReportsJuly 28, 2010

How Young Latinos Communicate with Friends in the Digital Age

When it comes to socializing and communicating with friends, young Latinos (ages 16 to 25) make extensive use of mobile technology. Half say they text message (50%) their friends daily, and 45% say they talk daily with friends on a cell phone.

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InteractivesDecember 11, 2009

Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

PublicationsDecember 11, 2009

Graphic: Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths Into Adulthood

Young Latino adults in the United States are more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults ages 16 to 25 say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number-48%-say that they themselves plan to get a college degree.

Multi-section ReportsMay 28, 2009

Latino Children: A Majority Are U.S.-Born Offspring of Immigrants

Hispanics now make up 22% of all children under the age of 18 in the United States–up from 9% in 1980–and as their numbers have grown, their demographic profile has changed.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The High Schools Hispanics Attend

A report on the characteristics of high schools attended by different racial and ethnic groups finds that Hispanic teens are more likely than blacks and whites to attend the nation’s largest public high schools.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The Higher Drop-Out Rate of Foreign-Born Teens

A report on high school enrollment points to the importance of schooling abroad in understanding the dropout problem for immigrant teens, finding that those teens have often fallen behind in their education before reaching the United States.