Multi-section ReportsMarch 24, 2011

Hispanics Account for More than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade

Census 2010: 50 Million Latinos

Multi-section ReportsApril 1, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Census: The Foreign Born Are More Positive

A new nationwide survey of Latinos finds that foreign-born Latinos are more positive and knowledgeable about the 2010 Census than are native-born Latinos.

PublicationsMarch 30, 2010

Statistical Profiles of the Hispanic and Foreign-Born Populations in the U.S.

A new demographic and economic profile of Latinos, based on 2008 census data, finds they are twice as likely as the overall U.S. population to lack health insurance coverage.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

PublicationsMay 28, 2009

Who’s Hispanic?

The question of who’s Hispanic — and who isn’t — turns out to be pretty complicated.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 25, 2007

Between Here and There: How Attached Are Latino Immigrants to Their Native Country?

Most Latino immigrants maintain some kind of connection to their native country by sending remittances, traveling back or telephoning relatives, but the extent to which they engage in these transnational activities varies considerably.

Fact SheetsJune 7, 2006

Hispanic Attitudes Toward Learning English

Fact Sheet

DatasetsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

The study was conducted for Pew Hispanic Center via telephone by International Communications Research, an independent research company.

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.