ReportsFebruary 13, 2012

Labor Force Growth Slows, Hispanic Share Grows

Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation’s labor force from 2010 to 2020, according to new projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

ReportsOctober 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

In the year following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers gained 656,000 jobs while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. As a result, the unemployment rate fell for immigrants while it rose for the native born.

ReportsDecember 15, 2008

Latino Workers in the Ongoing Recession: 2007 to 2008

A small but significant decline has occurred during the current recession in the share of Latino immigrants active in the U.S. labor force.

ReportsJune 4, 2008

Latino Labor Report, 2008: Construction Reverses Job Growth for Latinos

Due mainly to a slump in the construction industry, the unemployment rate for Hispanics in the U.S. rose to 6.5% in the first quarter of 2008, well above the 4.7% rate for all non-Hispanics.

ReportJanuary 23, 2008

Arizona: Population and Labor Force Characteristics, 2000-2006

Fact Sheet

ReportsAugust 21, 2007

1995-2005: Foreign-Born Latinos Make Progress on Wages

Foreign-born Latinos, especially the newly arrived, were much less likely to be low-wage earners in 2005 than in 1995.

ReportMarch 7, 2007

Construction Jobs Expand for Latinos Despite Slump in Housing Market

Fact Sheet

ReportsSeptember 27, 2006

Latino Labor Report 2006: Strong Gains in Employment

The Hispanic unemployment rate reached a historic low in the second quarter of 2006.

ReportsDecember 15, 2005

The Occupational Status and Mobility of Hispanics

Hispanics and whites perform different types of work in the labor market. Moreover, the occupational divide between the two largest segments of the labor force appears to be widening.

ReportsMay 2, 2005

Latino Labor Report, 2004

Hispanic workers enjoyed significant gains in employment in 2004. But the concentration of Latinos in relatively low-skill occupations contributed to reduced earnings for them for the second year in a row.