ReportsMay 13, 2010

Hispanics, High School Dropouts and the GED

Just one-in-ten Hispanic high school drop-outs has a General Educational Development (GED) credential, widely regarded as the best “second chance” pathway to college, vocational training and military service for adults who do not graduate high school.

ReportsDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

ReportsOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths Into Adulthood

Young Latino adults in the United States are more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.

ReportsOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults ages 16 to 25 say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number-48%-say that they themselves plan to get a college degree.

ReportsAugust 26, 2008

A Profile of Hispanic Public School Students

One-in-Five and Growing Fast:

ReportsMarch 14, 2007

Latinos Online

Hispanics with lower levels of education and English proficiency remain largely disconnected from the internet.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

The Higher Drop-Out Rate of Foreign-Born Teens

A report on high school enrollment points to the importance of schooling abroad in understanding the dropout problem for immigrant teens, finding that those teens have often fallen behind in their education before reaching the United States.

ReportsNovember 1, 2005

Recent Changes in the Entry of Hispanic and White Youth into College

In addition to longstanding concerns over high school completion, policymakers are increasingly focused on disparities in outcomes between Hispanic and white college students.

ReportsJune 14, 2005

Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics

Most of the unauthorized population lives in families, a quarter has at least some college education and illegal workers can be found in many sectors of the US economy.

ReportsJanuary 24, 2005

Hispanics: A People in Motion

The places Latinos live, the jobs they hold, the schooling they complete, the languages they speak, even their attitudes on key political and social issues, are all in flux.