Multi-section ReportsMay 13, 2010

Hispanics, High School Dropouts and the GED

Just one-in-ten Hispanic high school drop-outs has a General Educational Development (GED) credential, widely regarded as the best “second chance” pathway to college, vocational training and military service for adults who do not graduate high school.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults ages 16 to 25 say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number-48%-say that they themselves plan to get a college degree.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 26, 2008

A Profile of Hispanic Public School Students

One-in-Five and Growing Fast:

Multi-section ReportsJune 26, 2008

The Role of Schools in the English Language Learner Achievement Gap

Students designated as English language learners (ELL) tend to go to public schools that have low standardized test scores.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 30, 2007

The Changing Racial and Ethnic Composition of U.S. Public Schools

The 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in June to strike down school desegregation plans in Seattle and Louisville has focused public attention on the degree of racial and ethnic integration in the nation’s 93,845 public schools.

Multi-section ReportsJune 6, 2007

How Far Behind in Math and Reading are English Language Learners?

As Congress considers the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind law an analysis of recent data from standardized testing around the country shows that the fast growing number of students designated as English language learners are among those farthest behind.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 5, 2006

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education: New Students, New Schools

Since the mid-1990s, two trends have transformed the landscape of American public education: Enrollment has increased because of the growth of the Hispanic population, and the number of schools has also increased.