Multi-section ReportsJanuary 26, 2012

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

A majority of Latinos believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

In the year following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers gained 656,000 jobs while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. As a result, the unemployment rate fell for immigrants while it rose for the native born.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

A Pew Hispanic Center report based on a new nationwide survey of Latino youths and on analyses of government data examines the values, attitudes, experiences and self-identity of this generation as it comes of age in America.

Multi-section ReportsJanuary 8, 2009

Hispanics and the Economic Downturn: Housing Woes and Remittance Cuts

Almost one-in-ten (9%) Latino homeowners say they missed a mortgage payment or were unable to make a full payment and 3% say they received a foreclosure notice in the past year.

Fact SheetsMay 8, 2008

Hispanic Women in the United States, 2007

Fact Sheet

Multi-section ReportsDecember 13, 2007

2007 National Survey of Latinos: As Illegal Immigration Issue Heats Up, Hispanics Feel a Chill

Hispanics in the United States are feeling a range of negative effects from the increased public attention and stepped-up enforcement measures that have accompanied the growing national debate over illegal immigration.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 6, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Three

The vast majority of undocumented migrants from Mexico were gainfully employed before they left for the United States. Thus, failure to find work at home does not seem to be the primary reason that the estimated 6.3 million undocumented migrants from Mexico have come to the U.S.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 16, 2005

Hispanics and the Social Security Debate

Latinos have distinct demographic and economic characteristics that give them a unique stake in the debate over the future of Social Security.

Multi-section ReportsJanuary 24, 2005

Hispanics: A People in Motion

The places Latinos live, the jobs they hold, the schooling they complete, the languages they speak, even their attitudes on key political and social issues, are all in flux.