ReportsJuly 13, 2006

2006 National Survey of Latinos

Latinos are feeling more discriminated against, politically energized and unified following the immigration policy debate and the pro-immigration marches this spring.

ReportsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.

ReportsAugust 16, 2005

Attitudes toward Immigrants and Immigration Policy: Surveys among Latinos in the U.S. and in Mexico

A survey of U.S. Latinos shows that views are not unanimous on unauthorized migrants and U.S. policy toward them.

ReportsJuly 26, 2005

The New Latino South: The Context and Consequences of Rapid Population Growth

The Hispanic population is growing faster in much of the South than anywhere else in the United States.

ReportsJune 27, 2005

Hispanics and the 2004 Election: Population, Electorate and Voters

Hispanics accounted for half of the population growth in the United States between the elections of 2000 and 2004 but only one-tenth of the increase in the total votes cast.

ReportsMarch 14, 2005

Survey of Mexican Migrants, Part Two

Attitudes about Voting in Mexican Elections and Ties to Mexico

ReportsDecember 27, 2004

Dispersal and Concentration: Patterns of Latino Residential Settlement

Some 20 million Hispanics—57 percent of the total—lived in neighborhoods in which Hispanics made up less than half of the population at the time of the 2000 census.

ReportsApril 19, 2004

Changing Channels and Crisscrossing Cultures

Getting the news could be the single most extensive cross-cultural experience for the Hispanic population in America, according to a report issued today the Pew Hispanic Center. A growing number of Hispanics switch between English and Spanish to get the news. Rather than two audiences sharply segmented by language, the survey shows that many more Latinos get at least some of their news in both English and Spanish than in just one language or the other.

ReportsJanuary 8, 2004

Latino Attitudes On The War In Iraq, The Economy And The 2004 Election

Latino support for the war in Iraq and for President George W. Bush has surged since the capture of Saddam Hussein, but Latinos remain concerned about the condition of the U.S. economy and the long-term consequences of the war. In order to probe Latino views of the war, the economy, and the upcoming presidential race, the Pew Hispanic Center (PHC) conducted two national surveys of Latino adults. One took place in December 2003, just before Hussein’s capture, and the other in early January 2004

ReportsNovember 24, 2003

Remittance Senders And Receivers

Across the United States some six million immigrants from Latin America now send money to their families back home on a regular basis. The number of senders and the sums they dispatched grew even when the U.S. economy slowed, and looking to the future, the growth seems likely to continue and potentially to accelerate. The total remittance flow from the United States to Latin America and the Caribbean could come close to $30 billion this year, making it by far the largest single remittance channel in the world.