Multi-section ReportsOctober 5, 2006

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education: New Students, New Schools

Since the mid-1990s, two trends have transformed the landscape of American public education: Enrollment has increased because of the growth of the Hispanic population, and the number of schools has also increased.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 2, 2006

Hispanics and the 2006 Election

Fact Sheet

Multi-section ReportsSeptember 27, 2006

Latino Labor Report 2006: Strong Gains in Employment

The Hispanic unemployment rate reached a historic low in the second quarter of 2006.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 10, 2006

Growth in the Foreign-Born Workforce and Employment of the Native Born

Rapid increases in the foreign-born population at the state level are not associated with negative effects on the employment of native-born workers.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 13, 2006

2006 National Survey of Latinos

Latinos are feeling more discriminated against, politically energized and unified following the immigration policy debate and the pro-immigration marches this spring.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 5, 2006

Gender and Migration

Reflecting broad changes in their social and economic status, women around the world have been migrating more in recent decades and as a result have constituted an increasing share of migrant populations almost everywhere.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 30, 2006

America’s Immigration Quandary

A growing number of Americans believe that immigrants are a burden to the country, taking jobs and housing and creating strains on the health care system. Many people also worry about the cultural impact of the expanding number of newcomers in the U.S.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 7, 2006

Size and Characteristics of the Unauthorized Migrant Population in the U.S.

Estimates Based on the March 2005 Current Population Survey

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 22, 2006

Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections

Strict requirements, insufficient information about registration procedures and lack of public interest hobbled Mexico’s first effort to conduct absentee voting among its more than ten million adult citizens living in the United States.