Portrait of Rakesh KochharKochhar has over 20 years of research experience in the areas of labor economics and price and wage measurement and analysis. Prior to joining the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project, he was Senior Economist at Joel Popkin and Company, where he served as a consultant to government agencies, private firms, international agencies, and labor unions. Kochhar is a past President of the Society of Government Economists. His doctoral thesis at Brown University focused on the theory of labor migration.

Jun 19, 2014

Latino Jobs Growth Driven by U.S. Born

For the first time in nearly two decades, immigrants do not account for the majority of Hispanic workers in the United States. And most of the job gains made by Hispanics during the economic recovery have gone to U.S.-born workers.

Mar 21, 2012

The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery

Hispanics and Asians are gaining jobs at a faster rate in the economic recovery than are blacks and whites, immigrants are outpacing the native born, and men are faring better than women.

Feb 13, 2012

Labor Force Growth Slows, Hispanic Share Grows

Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation’s labor force from 2010 to 2020, according to new projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Jul 26, 2011

Hispanic Household Wealth Fell by 66% from 2005 to 2009

Median household wealth among Hispanics fell from $18,359 in 2005 to $6,235 in 2009—a 66% decline. This was larger than the decrease for black households (53%) and white households (16%), according to an analysis of newly-available Census Bureau data by the Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends project.

Mar 10, 2011

After the Great Recession: Native Born Workers Begin to Share in Jobs Recovery

For the first time since the official end of the Great Recession in June 2009, native-born workers in the second half of 2010 joined foreign-born workers in experiencing the beginnings of a recovery in employment.

Oct 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

In the year following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers gained 656,000 jobs while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. As a result, the unemployment rate fell for immigrants while it rose for the native born.

May 12, 2009

Minorities, Immigrants and Homeownership

The boom-and-bust cycle in the U.S. housing market over the past decade and a half has generated greater gains and larger losses for minority groups than it has for whites, according to an analysis of housing, economic and demographic data.

Feb 12, 2009

Unemployment Rose Sharply Among Latino Immigrants in 2008

The current recession is having an especially severe impact on employment prospects for immigrant Hispanics.

Jan 8, 2009

Hispanics and the Economic Downturn: Housing Woes and Remittance Cuts

Almost one-in-ten (9%) Latino homeowners say they missed a mortgage payment or were unable to make a full payment and 3% say they received a foreclosure notice in the past year.

Dec 15, 2008

Latino Workers in the Ongoing Recession: 2007 to 2008

A small but significant decline has occurred during the current recession in the share of Latino immigrants active in the U.S. labor force.