Portrait of Jeffrey S. PasselJeffrey Passel is a Senior Demographer at the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project. He is a nationally known expert on immigration to the United States and the demography of racial and ethnic groups. Passel formerly served as principal research associate at the Urban Institute's Labor, Human Services and Population Center. Passel has authored numerous studies on immigrant populations in America, focusing on such topics as undocumented immigration, the economic and fiscal impact of the foreign born, and the impact of welfare reform on immigrant populations.

Mar 28, 2007

Growing Share of Immigrants Choosing Naturalization

The proportion of all legal foreign-born residents who have become naturalized U.S. citizens rose to 52% in 2005, the highest level in a quarter of a century and a 15 percentage point increase since 1990.

Mar 7, 2006

Size and Characteristics of the Unauthorized Migrant Population in the U.S.

Analysis of the March 2005 Current Population Survey shows that there were 11.1 million unauthorized migrants in the United States a year ago.

Sep 27, 2005

Rise, Peak and Decline: Trends in U.S. Immigration 1992 – 2004

The number of migrants coming to the United States each year, legally and illegally, grew very rapidly starting in the mid-1990s, hit a peak at the end of the decade, and then declined substantially after 2001.

Jun 27, 2005

Hispanics and the 2004 Election: Population, Electorate and Voters

Hispanics accounted for half of the population growth in the United States between the elections of 2000 and 2004 but only one-tenth of the increase in the total votes cast.

Jun 14, 2005

Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics

Most of the unauthorized population lives in families, a quarter has at least some college education and illegal workers can be found in many sectors of the US economy.

Mar 21, 2005

Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Undocumented Population

The undocumented population of the US now numbers nearly 11 million people, including more than 6 million Mexicans according to new estimates based on the most recent official data available.

Mar 16, 2005

Hispanics and the Social Security Debate

Latinos have distinct demographic and economic characteristics that give them a unique stake in the debate over the future of Social Security.

Oct 14, 2003

The Rise Of The Second Generation

As it continues to grow, the composition of the Hispanic population is undergoing a fundamental change: Births in the United States are outpacing immigration as the key source of growth. Over the next twenty years this will produce an important shift in the makeup of the Hispanic population with second-generation Latinos–the U.S.-born children of immigrants– emerging as the largest component of that population. Given the very substantial differences in earnings, education, fluency in English, and attitudes between foreign-born and native-born Latinos, this shift has profound implications for many realms of public policy, and indeed for anyone seeking to understand the nature of demographic change in the United States.