December 20, 2017

Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away

Appendix B: Additional Table

Demographics of self-identified Hispanics and non-Hispanics

% among U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry

Self-identified Hispanics Self-identified
non-Hispanics
All Foreign born U.S. born Second generation Third or higher
generation
Gender
Male 50 51 50 52 46 53
Female 50 49 50 48 54 47
Age
18-29 29 18 43  51  30  38
30-49 43 47 37 33 44 34
50-64 19 23 13 11 15 18
65 and older 9 11 7 5 10 10
Marital status
Married 38 44 31 27 37 38
Never married 29 18 43 49 33 35
Divorced/separated/widowed 19 23 14 12 16 12
Living with a partner 13 14 12 11 13 13
Has children
Yes 67 80 51 47 58 56
No 32 20 49 53 42 44
Nativity1
U.S. born  44 0 100 100 100 88
Foreign born 56 100 0 0 0 12
Immigrant generations2
Foreign born 56 100  -- -- -- 12
Second generation 26 -- 60 100 -- 17
Third generation 10 -- 23 -- 59 23
Fourth or higher generation 5 -- 11 -- 30 38
Language dominance3
English dominant 28 7 56 43 75 90
Bilingual 36 32 41 51 24 10
Spanish dominant 36 61 4 6  *  *
Educational attainment4
Less than high school 32 48 11 11 12 9
High school graduate 28 28 32 34 29 35
Two-year degree/Some college 26 17 38 37 41 28
Bachelor’s degree or more 13 8 18 18 18 28
Has Hispanic/Latino spouse5
Yes 78 93 51 63 35 15
No 22 7 49 36 64 85
Family income
Less than $30,000 44 50 36 39 33 35
$30,000 to $74,999 30 28 32 34 30 30
$75,000 or more 13 8 20 17 24 23
Hispanic origin
Mexican 61 59 64 62 65 14
Puerto Rican 9 8 10 11 9 8
Dominican 4 6 2 3 * 4
Cuban 4 5 3 3 2 10
Salvadoran 4 5 3 3 2 1
Spanish 3 1 7 3 13 26
Other 12 16 7 9 5 13
Religion
Catholic 54 64 40 46 32 16
Protestant 25 23 28 23 35 48
   Evangelical     18     17     19     16     24     29
   Mainline     7     5     9     7     11     20
Other religion6 3 2 5 5 4 4
Unaffiliated 17 10 25 24 28 29
Region
Northeast 15 18 10 13 7 21
Midwest 8 5 12 12 14 14
South 37 37 36 35 38 40
West 41 40 41 40 41 26

Note: 1. Foreign born includes Puerto Ricans in this analysis. 2. “Second generation” refers to people born in the United States, with at least one parent born in another country or in Puerto Rico. “Third generation” refers to people born in the United States, with both parents born in the United States and at least one grandparent born in another country or in Puerto Rico. “Fourth or higher generation” refers to people born in the United States, with both parents born in the United States, and all grandparents born in the United States. 3. “Spanish dominant” refers to persons who say they are more proficient in Spanish than in English. “Bilingual” refers to persons who say they are proficient in both English and Spanish. “English-dominant” persons say they are more proficient in English than in Spanish. 4. Educational attainment is based on those ages 25 and older. 5. Based on respondents who are married or living with a partner. 6. “Other religion” includes Mormon, Orthodox, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, Something else and Unitarian (Universalist). Voluntary responses of “Don’t know” or “Refused” not shown. Self-identified Hispanics are those who say they are Hispanic. Self-identified non-Hispanics are those who say they are not Hispanic or Latino but say they have Hispanic ancestry or heritage.
Source: Pew Research Center 2015 National Survey of Latinos (Oct. 21-Nov. 30, 2015) and survey of self-identified non-Hispanics with Hispanic ancestry or heritage only (Nov. 11, 2015-Feb. 7, 2016).
“Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away”

Pew Research Center