November 19, 2015

More Mexicans Leaving Than Coming to the U.S.

About This Report

This report analyzes the magnitude and trend of recent migration flows between Mexico and the United States, the motivations of Mexican immigrants who left the U.S. and returned to their home country, the characteristics of Mexican-born immigrants in the U.S. now and two and a half decades ago, the connections Mexicans have with family and friends in the U.S., and their views about life in the U.S. and U.S. immigration policy.

The report draws on data sources from both Mexico and the U.S. The principal Mexican data source is the Survey of Demographic Dynamics of 2014 (Encuesta Nacional de Dinámica Demográfica or ENADID), and previously published results based on the 2000 and 2010 Mexican decennial censuses. The principal U.S. data sources are the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS) March 1994 to 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplements, the American Community Survey (ACS) for 2005 to 2013, and U.S. decennial censuses from 1850 to 2000. The report also uses data from Pew Research Center’s spring 2015 survey in Mexico.

This report was written by Research Associate Ana Gonzalez-Barrera. Mark Hugo Lopez, Claudia Deane and D’Vera Cohn provided editorial guidance in the drafting of this report. Richard Wike, Katie Simmons and Jacob Poushter provided comments on earlier drafts. Senior Demographer Jeffrey Passel provided statistical and editorial guidance. Gustavo López and Danielle Cuddington provided research assistance. Gustavo López, Danielle Cuddington and Eileen Patten number-checked the report. Michael Keegan, information graphics designer; and Michael Suh, associate digital producer, provided digital support for the report Molly Rohal and Aleksandra Sandstrom were the copy editors. Find related reports online at pewresearch.org/hispanic and pewresearch.org/global.